Newspaper Licensing Agency instigates bold plan to hasten death of newspapers.

According to a circular sent to members of the Chartered Institute of Public Relations, and seen by Press Gazette, the NLA will be introducing a new form of licence from 1 September to regulate “web aggregator services (such as Meltwater) that forward links to newspaper websites and for press cuttings agencies undertaking this type of activity”.

From January 2010, the licence charges will also apply to PR practitioners and “other organisations forwarding links to newspaper websites as part of their commercial activity”. (Press Gazette)

Jeff Jarvis comments on NLA via Twitter

Jeff Jarvis comments on NLA via Twitter

Press Gazette article

NLA Press Release

The new service, called eClipsweb, will offer a complete feed of newspapers’ online content direct to cuttings aggregators and press cuttings agencies. Powered directly from newspapers’ own content-management systems, eClipsweb will make web-based media monitoring faster and richer and provide a permanent record for PR and communications professionals.

The NLA will also extend its licensing remit to cover local and national newspapers’ web content from September, with charging taking effect from January.

David Pugh, managing director of the NLA, said: “We have two aims: to contribute to the growth of web monitoring; and to protect the rights of publishers. Research shows that 23% of newspapers’ online content never appears in print and that the internet is growing in influence as a resource for news. So it’s vital to have comprehensive monitoring coverage of newspapers’ websites – and vital that the publishers are properly rewarded for their work.”

From September 2009, web aggregators that charge clients for their services will require a NLA licence and be charged from January 2010, The press cuttings agencies that either ‘scrape’ content themselves or buy in services from aggregators will also be licensed and charged. Client companies that receive & forward links from these commercial aggregators within their organisation will also require a licence.

David Pugh added: “We have consulted extensively across the industry – the incremental charges for web cuttings will be low and manageable. I stress this is not about individuals sharing links – we think that’s great for newspapers and promoting their websites and their readership.  What we are doing is making sure that newspapers are rewarded fairly for professional use of their web content. Source

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